Jurassic Park 3D (2013) finds a new dimension

On a series of remote islands gazillionaire, Richard Hammond has engineered a very unique theme park filled with dinosaurs. The attractions' safety for guests is challenged by lawyers. To avoid his park being shut down, Hammond invites chaos-tician Ian Malcolm, paleobotanist Ellie Satler, paleontologist Alan Grant, and his two grandchildren to review the park's experience. Things do not go as planned.

I'm not sure how many people haven't seen Jurassic Park, but seeing the movie for its 3D re-release completely nostalgic. Ellie Sattler was the biggest reason I was looking forward to the event. Her intelligence, humor, wearing appropriate outdoor clothes, and badassery. Seeing her on the big screen proved how much I love her fight against sexism in survival situations. Next to Ellie, everything else was pretty much the dinosaur snot-frosting on a fossilized cake.

Story wise, the movie is superb. When Hollywood tries to sell me a new movie to see in 3D just because it's in 3D, I try not to buy into the superficial merit that I'll somehow like the movie more. Newly released films are a gamble because 90% of the time these days the trailers are better than the two-hour experience. Knowing I already knew the scenes of Jurassic Park by heart gave me some comfort knowing at least I liked the movie way before plunking down extra change for the third-dimensional experience.

Now in terms of the actual conversion, I was a little disappointed. Upon seeing the 3D re-release of Titanic in 2012, the conversion was wonderful. For the latter, whether you were outside on the first class deck walking with Jack and Rose, or down below dancing n drinking to the third class bands, there was a feeling that you always on board the ship. I had never felt so claustrophobic when all the passengers were racing to get on a lifeboat. I hold other conversions up to that standard.

The movie still exudes the same chilling terror because of Steven Speilberg's direction. When Dennis Nedry is trying to drive his little Butterfinger happy ass through the rainstorm, and all the security systems are shut down on the dinosaur barricades, there is a definite realization just how much the characters are on their own. Seeing the dinosaurs on a big Imax-like screen gave a bigger scale of the Tyrannosaurus Rex attacking the little Ford Explorers, or Tim and Alan scrambling down the gigantic tree as the car falls above them. Hearing the boom of the Gallimimus pounding the ground as they flocked towards Alan, Lex, and Tim was crystal clear. The adventure of the film is definitely larger than life.

Jurassic Park on its own is quite colossal, however, the conversion didn't leave up to anything special. The dinosaurs didn't feel like they could swallow up the movie theater, the t-rex's breath hitting us in the faith, feeling the ground shake beneath its mighty roar.

In terms of 3D over 2D, I really didn't see that much of a difference. Only one scene jumped out at me and it's seconds of Lex flashing the light in the eye of the T-Rex. There was a real sense that you were inside the car with her for that moment. For the rest of the film, that feeling didn't remain. Because of the grand scale of the film on a big screen, the experience was still pretty unforgettable.

Rating: ★★★

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